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September 19th, 2018   HFZ Capital Group has announced the official launch of listings at The XI, a Bjarke Ingels-designed, full-block, mixed-use development between the High Line...

Thanks to a number of condo, rental and co-op buildings launching sales and leasing this spring and summer, New Yorkers on the prowl for a...

HFZ Capital Group, a partner of U.S. Immigration Fund, made The Real Deal Magazine’s top ten list of developers in Manhattan by square footage. At the number nine spot, HFZ and U.S. Immigration Fund's project, 76 Eleventh Ave, consisting of two twisting towers, will span 764,332 square feet.   By Kathryn Brenzel | Research by Adam Pincus | February 19, 2018 [caption id="attachment_25125" align="aligncenter" width="650"] Clockwise from left: 30 Hudson Yards, Central Park Tower, Gary Barnett, Bruce Flatt, Stephen Ross and One Manhattan West[/caption] One look at the Far West Side in Manhattan, and it’s pretty clear which developers are the city’s most active. Related Companies and Brookfield Property Partners are respectively the top two most active developers in Manhattan, according to an analysis by The Real Deal. Related is working on 9 million square feet of development, most of which is at Hudson Yards, while Brookfield is handling 3.8 million square feet nearby at Manhattan West. TRD compiled a list of new buildings and major renovations filed with the city’s Department of Buildings since 2005 that have not yet been issued a temporary certificate of occupancy or, if a condo building, declared effective as of mid-January 2018. Here are the top 10 developers by square footage:   1) Related Companies | 9 million sf The largest of Related’s active projects is 30 Hudson Yards, an office tower that’s expected to rise nearly 1,300 feet high and span 3.1 million square feet. Unsurprisingly, the bulk of Related’s construction attention is focused on Hudson Yards, where five active projects will span 8.3 million square feet. Nearby, on the High Line, the developer plans to build a 181-unit condo tower. The project, at 515 West 18th Street, is slated to span 343,051 square feet. 2) Brookfield Property Partners | 3.8 million sf Brookfield’s One and Two Manhattan West office towers will respectively span 2 million square feet and 1.7 million square feet. The company’s developing a much smaller retail building nearby that will be 26,841 square feet. In a statement, the company’s chairman, Ric Clark, noted that 1.75 million square feet has been leased at One Manhattan West, meaning that it’s 84 percent occupied. 3) Extell Development | 3.44 million sf When completed, Extell’s Central Park Tower at 217 West 57th Street will be the city’s tallest residential building at 1,775 feet high. The supertall is expected to be 1.2 million square feet. Though shorter, One Manhattan Square also clocks in at around 1.2 million square feet, according to the DOB. Central Park Tower is also the most expensive condominium project in U.S. history, with a targeted sellout of $4 billion. 4) Silverstein Properties | 3.4 million sf Silverstein only has two projects under construction: 3 World Trade Center, which will span 2.8 million square feet, and 520 West 41st Street, which will be 609,945 square feet. The company is still waiting on an anchor tenant for 2 World Trade Center, a planned 2.8 million-square-foot office tower that will be designed by Bjarke Ingels. In September, the New York Post reported that Deutsche Bank was looking at the tower, as well as 50 Hudson Yards and the Time Warner Center, as a potential new location for its Manhattan headquarters. 5) Moinian Group | 2.6 million sf Moinian’s largest ongoing project is 3 Hudson Boulevard, a 53-story, 1.8 million- square-foot office tower on Manhattan’s Far West Side. The developer is trying to raise between $250 million and $350 million in EB-5 funding for the project, which is expected to cost more than $2 billion. The tower still doesn’t have an anchor tenant. 6) Tishman Speyer | 2.2 million sf The Bjarke Ingels-designed office building at 509 West 34th Street, dubbed “the Spiral,” is expected to span 2.2 million square feet. The project is the only new building that Tishman Speyer is currently working on that hasn’t yet been issued a TCO. Pfizer agreed in August to take 800,000 square feet and become the building’s anchor tenant. 7) Anbang Insurance Group | 1.63 million sf Earlier this week, the CEO of Hilton Worldwide Holdings announced that despite reports that Anbang is selling off its assets, the Waldorf Astoria isn’t one of them. The Chinese firm closed the Waldorf last year, to begin converting the storied hotel into 409 condo units. 8) General Investment & Development Cos. | 1.61 million sf GID is working on three residential projects, all of which are part of the developer’s massive Waterline Square development on the Upper West Side. The largest of the towers is Two Waterline Square at 400 West 61st Street, which will be 880, 994 square feet. 9) HFZ Capital Group | 1.5 million sf Another Bjarke Ingels-designed building is among the largest currently under construction. HFZ’s 76 Eleventh Avenue, known as the Eleventh, will feature two towers — 25 and 35 stories — that appear to be twisting away from each other, as if frozen in the middle of a dance. The project will span 764,332 square feet. 10) Chetrit Group | 1.47 million sf Chetrit is working on five buildings, the largest of which is a 380,341-square-foot residential building at 209 East 19th Street that will be part of the four-building development known as Gramercy Square. The second-largest is a condo building also planned for the development at 228 East 20th Street, which will be 375,107 square feet. The third-largest is a 46-story, hotel and residential building planned for 545 West 37th Street. That project is expected to be 373,275 square feet.  

76 Eleventh Ave, a U.S. Immigration Fund project, is located in what is now dubbed as “Silicon Alley” with many High-tech companies, including Google, moving to Chelsea and the Meatpacking District. 

Director of JLL's New York research office explains how the Meatpacking District has now commanded some of the highest asking rents in manhattan and that  “Google’s historical and continued expansions in the Meatpacking Districts underlie its overall desirability within the tech sector and other industry segments as well.”

By Rich Bockmann | February 15, 2018

[caption id="attachment_25117" align="aligncenter" width="600"] 860 Washington Street, 61 9th Avenue, and 412 West 15th Street (Credit: Google Maps, Google)[/caption]

Since Google first entered the Meatpacking District in 2005 with its lease at 111 Eighth Avenue and its latest deal to buy the Chelsea Market building next door for $2.4 billion, the neighborhood’s growing boutique office market has exploded.

Developers looking to cash in on the “Google effect” have built and are working on a number of boutique office projects in the supply-constrained submarket, chasing asking rents that have climbed as high as $200 per square foot.

But even as developers add hundreds of thousands of square feet of new space to the neighborhood, the added inventory just can’t keep pace with Google’s voracious appetite.

The Meatpacking District will see more than 1.1 million square feet of new supply added since the development wave started in 2014 and the end of 2019, according to data from JLL. (The firm marks the neighborhood’s boundaries as everything west of Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River, between Gansevoort and West 16th streets.)

Some of the new ground-up or repositioned properties include Vornado Realty Trust and Aurora Capital’s 61 Ninth Avenue, Romanoff Equities and Property Group Partners’ 860 Washington Street, RockPoint Group’s 412 West 15th Street, and William Kaufman Organization’s 2 Gansevoort Street, all of which have attracted well-capitalized tenants.

While Google’s exact footprint in the neighborhood is unclear, it easily occupies more than the new supply total, and by some estimates it may have more than double. The internet search giant’s parent company Alphabet has leased nearly 665,000 square feet in just three buildings: Chelsea Market, 85 10th Avenue and at Pier 57 since 2010, according to JLL.

The company’s footprint at 111 Eighth Avenue, which it bought for $1.8 billion in 2010, is somewhat of an industry secret, as Google’s quietly bought existing tenants out of their leases at the 2.9 million-square-foot behemoth to give it more space.

Conservative estimates put its spread there at close to nearly 900,000 square feet, but on the high-end sources said it could occupy as much as 2 million. That means that even though the neighborhood is one of the most active submarkets for new development, new supply can’t keep up. And it’s having an impact on rents.

“The Meatpacking District commands some of the highest asking rents we found in Manhattan,” said Craig Leibowitz, a director in JLL’s New York research office. “Google’s historical and continued expansions in the Meatpacking Districts underlie its overall desirability within the tech sector and other industry segments as well.”

Average starting rents in the neighborhood were $128 per square foot last year, a 68 percent premium over the average for Midtown South, JLL’s data show.

That premium was just 16 percent back in 2014 when new buildings started adding much-needed supply to the area.

Other industries like insurance and finance firms, which are more willing to pay top dollar than other tenants, have moved into the neighborhood and helped push up rents.

And Google’s shown that it will snap up space wherever and whenever possible. Back in 2015, the company inked a deal to lease 250,000 square feet at RXR Realty and Youngwoo & Associates’ Pier 57, and just announced plans to take another 70,000 square feet.

The company is also taking more than 200,000 square feet at RXR’s Starrett Lehigh building on a short-term basis until the pier is ready in late 2019.

Original Post: therealdeal.com